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Ways to Play Volleyball

1 minute, 24 seconds read


It’s a good idea to research the volleyball programs available to your child before signing him or her up to play. Each program differs in their structure, cost and commitment level.

Club volleyball

Age

10–18

Good for

Advanced players that want to increase their skills and play competitively.

Commitment

The club season typically goes for around six months and includes 2–3 practices per week and tournaments every other weekend. Club teams travel at metro, regional and state level and require a larger financial commitment than other leagues.

Structure

Club volleyball is focused on building skills and playing at a competitive level. Players try out and are assigned to a team—or not—based on performance.

School volleyball

Age

Middle and high school

Good for

Those interested in playing with classmates and friends while representing their school.

Commitment

Practices occur daily after school with two to three matches per week. The competition and commitment level of school volleyball can vary greatly based on the school’s size and culture.

Structure

Similar to club, players try out for school volleyball and are placed on teams according to skill and performance. School teams play against their counterparts from opposing schools.

Community/recreational volleyball

Age

Young kids to adults

Good for

Anyone who wants to play volleyball for fun and to stay active.

Commitment

Community volleyball features the lowest financial and time commitment. Teams
practice once or twice a week, focusing on fundamentals and understanding the game.
Players are not expected to train during the offseason

Structure

Community leagues focus less on competition and more on learning and being active. Coaches are often parents or volunteers and players do not normally try out to be placed on teams.

Sports in this article

Volleyball

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